Tuesday, May 31, 2011

Sha'arai Shomayim Cemetery Mobile, Alabama

The entrance gate to Sha'arai Shomayim.

I discovered the Sha'arai Shomayim Cemetery or Gates of Heaven   about 3 months go. It  is a historic Jewish cemetery located across the street from the more famous Magnolia Cemetery. The word Sha'arai Shomayim translates to Gates of Heaven. This beautify cemetery is hidden off of a main road and very few people in Mobile know about it. Although I grow up in the neighborhood close by the cemetery I did not know about it until I read about it in a book on historic Mobile cemetery's. This place  is a very well preserved 19th century cemetery with century's old live oak trees, intricate marble monuments and mid 19th century mail order cast iron. I love the cast iron gazebo in the middle of the cemetery. This would be a nice place to have lunch one day.     

Sha'arai Shomayim Cemetery is a historic Jewish cemetery located in Mobile, Alabama, United States. It was established by Congregation Sha'arai Shomayim in 1876 after their previous cemetery, Jewish Rest in the adjacent Magnolia Cemetery, was filled to capacity. The cemetery is situated on 15 acres (6.1 ha) and is surrounded by a 19th century cast-iron fence and live oak trees. The entrance is through an ornamental arched gate inscribed with the congregation name in Hebrew letters.

The gates feature the Star of David on the gate post.








The Eichold-Haas-Brown mausoleum It was designed by architect George B. Rogers and features many Middle Eastern design motifs and the Star of David.


A lawn-covered central avenue divides the cemetery and features a large 1870's cast-iron gazebo in the center.

19th century cast-iron urn

A lawn-covered central avenue divides the cemetery and features a large 1870's cast-iron gazebo in the center.

A cst-iron stag head basket at top

A lawn-covered central avenue divides the cemetery and features a large 1870's cast-iron gazebo in the center.

Detail of 1870's cast-iron gazebo in the center.


19th century catalog showing a cast iron gazebo similar to the one in the cemetery. Note the stag head basket at top

19th century catalog showing a cast iron gazebo similar to the one in the cemetery. Note the stag head basket at top



My boyfriend Jason posing on a 19th century urn

After knowing my new boyfriend Jason for a few weeks I showed him my hidden spot. He rested in the cool shade of the 19th century Gazebo




A 19th century Urn


The Leinkauf monument, one of the many markers representing the Ark of the Covenant.





The Lowenstein mausoleum, an example of Egyptian Revival architecture

The Lowenstein mausoleum, an example of Egyptian Revival architecture

The Lowenstein mausoleum, an example of Egyptian Revival architecture

A Jewish custom of placing colored stones on the graves.  

3 comments:

  1. As many times a year as one goes to pay respect to one's mother and father, it is still a chore in very hot weather. Which I assume Mobile has for half the year. The huge trees and gazebo are beautiful and make the visits shadier and more attractive.

    Well done Mobile for establishing a beautiful site and even better for preserving it well.
    Melbourne's huge Jewish cemetery doesn't have a tree or a bench to sit on, let alone a beautiful gazebo.

    Hels

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  2. I know it sounds strange, but we love to visit cemeteries when we take trips. I think the Victorians created the most beautiful. We will definitely look this one up on our next trip to Mobile.

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